If you have something worth sharing, send it along


What was important last week seems completely irrelevant today.  Thus, instead of focusing exclusively on our editorial content, which was carefully planned through May, Legal Evolution is turning to its readership to explore what’s important and worth sharing.

Legal Evolution’s readership is not large (~6,500 sessions / 4,750 unique users during a big month), but it’s very distinctive, made up of innovators and early adopters from law firms, legal departments, legaltech, NewLaw, law schools (faculty and students), regulators, consultants, government agencies, public interest organizations, and the BigFour.  For the next several weeks or months, a sizable portion of this remarkable group has a lot of extra time on its hands.  This creates a very large space for reflection, which is the seedbed of creativity.  It’s hard to overstate the potential social value that could flow from this otherwise dire black swan event.
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A story for the New Year.  Maybe you can relate.


I recently turned 57 years old.  Although I am dismayed and disappointed by many things happening in our republic, and impatient with an industry, profession and educational complex that is supposed to operate in the public interest, whatever quantum of cynicism I possessed went away in 2019. Moreover, it happened quickly, albeit many of the pieces were put into place more a decade ago.
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No matter what happens, we’re all going to learn something.


In 2014, I was invited to lunch with Joe Andrew, the chairman of Dentons, in his DC office.  The invitation came from John Fernandez, an Indiana Law alum who joined Dentons a couple of years earlier after two decades in government.  Joe and John came up through the ranks together in Indiana Democratic politics, with Andrew eventually becoming Chairman of the Indiana Democratic Party (from 1995-1999) and Chairman of the Democratic National Committee (1999-2001).
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The Difficult Problem Framework is a simple tool that requires continuous learning and objectivity. Part II of a two-part series.


The framework above was developed to solve very difficult problems related to organizational change, particularly those now facing the legal field. I realize the framework looks laughably simple. That said, it’s harder to apply than