Legal Productivity Problem


Lawyers Trust Fund of Illinois has been thinking about this question for more than 30 years.  Often, the answer involves legaltech.


On the outside chance that the afterlife involves a meeting with St. Peter at the Pearly gates, those working for the Lawyers Trust Fund of Illinois (LTF) will have good story to tell. 


Innovation hype is alienating too many practicing lawyers. This is because we forgot that lawyers innovate in the realm of substantive law.  It’s time to fix that.


Last year I was at a conference on law firm innovation organized by the Ark Group. To close things out, the event’s chairperson, Patrick McKenna, walked attendees

When lawyers come together to discuss the future — in law firms, law schools, bar associations, etc — the conversation inevitably turns to clients.  Although this is a wonderful and redeeming impulse, it almost always results in confusing and unsatisfying dialogue that goes nowhere. Why does this happen? Because lawyers focus on their detailed knowledge

If we categorize all of our business conversations into the above four buckets, which bucket is the fullest?

Unfortunately, I vote for bucket 4.  We end up in bucket 4 because we want to be perceived as being fully informed.  Yet, being fully informed takes a lot of solitary, uncompensated effort with no certain prospect

modriatylertechEarlier this week, Modria (mentioned in Post 008) was acquired by Tyler Technologies, a publicly traded company that specializes in information management solutions to local governments. See press release.  Tyler Technology is headquartered in Plano, Texas and has 3,800 employees. It’s total 2016 revenues were $776 million. See 2016 Annual Report. Modria’s