Legal Ops is a discipline for both buyers and sellers of legal services


Today Legal Evolution is delighted to welcome David Cunningham, Chief Information Officer at Winston & Strawn.  I met David several years ago at the CLOC Institute when I asked Connie Brenton for the names of folks working in law firms who were embracing the legal operations movement. The first name she mentioned was David Cunningham. 
Continue Reading


Probably not. Maybe Legal Evolution isn’t a blog.


Starting today, Legal Evolution will move to a biweekly Sunday publication schedule with occasional off-cycle posts connected to noteworthy developments. Then, over the summer of 2020–from Memorial Day to Labor Day–we’ll resume weekly publication. This is a publication schedule keyed to the academic year and the same a last year. See Post 065 (announcing 2018-2019 schedule).
Continue Reading


A legal technologist who can write


In May, I published Post 092, which provided guidelines for guest contributors.  My primary goal — or more accurately, highest hope — was to find a few professionals who possessed the communication skills to explain very technical but important topics to Legal Evolution readers, particularly in areas related to legal technology.
Continue Reading


This week, we are fortunate to have a special guest contribution from Jason Moyse, a very talented legal innovator and entrepreneur based in Toronto.  After cutting his teeth as a legal counsel and program manager at Xerox Canada, Jason has been an active participant in some North America’s and the UK’s most interesting and important legal innovation projects, including LawMade (principal), MDR Lab (advisory board), Trustbot (advisory board), CodeX (fellow), Elevate Services (Manager, Legal Business Solutions), and the MarS LegalX cluster team (industry lead).

In early June, Jason travelled to Redmond, Washington to serve as outsider chronicler of Microsoft’s Trusted Advisor Forum. 
Continue Reading

Photo by Jehyun Sung on Unsplash

Post 100 is Henderson’s opinion. It’s also a note to introduce Jordan Couch’s essay on the Washington State Bar.


The U.S. legal profession is suffering from an enormous leadership vacuum.  As a collective group, the lawyers with the most stature and gravitas — law school deans, managing partners of prestigious firms, GC of major companies, state and federal judges — are failing to step up, largely because each has a day job that is all consuming. As a result, profits per partner climb, in-house lawyers get their bonus, law schools hang onto their US News ranking, and the courts make it through another challenging fiscal year. But collectively, we have very few establishment leaders exhorting us to evolve in the public interest. That’s a vacuum.
Continue Reading


Guidelines for guest contributors


When I launched Legal Evolution in the spring of 2017, the vision was to create a publication where content on the legal market and legal innovation would be method-driven (theory, data, case studies, cross-industry comparisons, history, story telling) but with a style and format accessible and engaging to those building solutions

The most valuable contribution a legal entrepreneur can make to the legal industry is to share founder stories, especially mistakes and lessons learned.  Another value-add is to publicly state, “this is our strategy,” so the entire market can learn what works and what doesn’t. On today’s Legal Evolution, Liam Brown, the Founder and Executive Chairman

As editor of Legal Evolution, I am pleased to announce that Evan Parker is joining Legal Evolution as a regular contributor.

Many readers likely remember Evan’s guest post from the fall, where he presented compelling data showing that, controlling for a wide range of factors, law firms with a higher percentage of diverse attorneys are significantly more profitable.  See Parker, “Missing in Action: Data-Driven Approaches to Improve Diversity (074),” Legal Evolution, Nov. 25, 2018 (+$180K per partner). In Post 086, Evan takes on the task of measuring law firm culture in the London-UK market, showing how data from Legal Cheek’s Insider Scorecard can be used to create and guide a strategy for associate-level talent.
Continue Reading

Legal Evolution is proud to welcome contributor Jason Barnwell.  Regular readers are likely to remember Jason from the detailed write-ups of Microsoft’s Trusted Advisor Forum on Innovation, see Post 068 (by me); Post 069 (epic post by Jae Um), as Jason was the person who was charged with creating and implementing this very important strategic


Sometimes, to protect and promote the long-term interest of stakeholders, leaders have to take difficult public positions. The decision won’t be popular or clearly right at the time, yet the risks of deflecting or avoiding a firm stance are just too high, at least for the collective.  For legal education, one of the best examples of this type of leadership occurred in 2014 when Dan Rodriguez was serving as President of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS).  
Continue Reading