The graphic above reflects three different types of innovation “outcomes”:

  1. Initiation of an innovation adoption process that results in an organization making a decision to adopt an innovation. See Post 015
  2. Implementation of the adoption decision, which entails planning, change management, and redefining/restructuring and clarifying the innovation in the field so that it delivers its intended benefits. See Post 015
  3. Adoption Success, which presumes success in both initiation and implementation.

This is Part III of a three-part series on innovation in organizations.  In Parts I and II (Posts 015 and 016), we discussed how multivariate regression models are built around an “outcome” we care about, such as organizational innovation.  These models give us insight on how to influence the likelihood of the outcome. In turn, these insights become of the basis more effective strategies and interventions.…

glasses_diffusionAre rapidly adopted innovations more valuable and important than innovations that take a long time to take hold? Not necessarily.

Post 011 is part of LE’s foundational series on diffusion theory.  Here’s the key point:  Speed of adoption is not a reliable guide for an innovation’s importance. In fact, competitive advantage is much more likely to lie among slower ideas where innovators focus on several key factors to accelerate the rate of adoption.

It is difficult to accept an insight this counterintuitive. Thus, we need an illustration.…

Post 007 is another building block in our understanding of diffusion theory.  This sounds like the spinach of blog posts.  And perhaps it is. To make high quality decisions in a complex, rapidly changing legal industry, we need a high quality theoretical lens.  Others have done…